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  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Deprescribing, the clinically supervised process of tapering or stopping medications with the goal of minimizing inappropriate medication use and improving patient outcomes, has gained significant attention in the last decade. While deprescribing has been mostly used as a solution to address inappropriate medication use and polypharmacy in older adults, there is growing evidence of its utility throughout the lifespan. In addition, finding the appropriate methodological approach in evaluating the impact of deprescribing interventions on health-related outcomes is a topic of interest for clinicians and pharmacoepidemiologists all around the world. Existing Deprescribing Networks (Canadian Deprescribing Network- CaDeN, US Deprescribing Research Network- USDeN, Australian Deprescribing Network- ADeN, or the Network of European Researchers in Deprescribing - NERD) provide valuable resources for clinicians and researchers. Some of these networks provide useful clinical tools, such as evidence-based guidance for implementing deprescribing protocols in clinical practice, while others focus on researchers, offering training opportunities, pilot funding, and tools for conducting research. The evidence to support deprescribing efforts is based on research showing a wide variety of negative health effects of inappropriate medications and polypharmacy, as well as randomized trials testing the efficacy and/or effectiveness of deprescribing interventions on reducing the use of targeted medications. However, clinical studies of medication withdrawal are limited due to challenges in recruitment and retention of participants, as well as limited power to study clinical outcomes and often limited measures of patient-centered outcomes that matter for patients and their caregivers. Co-sponsored by the US Deprescribing Research Network (USDeN) and Australian Deprescribing Network (ADeN).

    Deprescribing, the clinically supervised process of tapering or stopping medications with the goal of minimizing inappropriate medication use and improving patient outcomes, has gained significant attention in the last decade. While deprescribing has been mostly used as a solution to address inappropriate medication use and polypharmacy in older adults, there is growing evidence of its utility throughout the lifespan. In addition, finding the appropriate methodological approach in evaluating the impact of deprescribing interventions on health-related outcomes is a topic of interest for clinicians and pharmacoepidemiologists all around the world. Existing Deprescribing Networks (Canadian Deprescribing Network- CaDeN, US Deprescribing Research Network- USDeN, Australian Deprescribing Network- ADeN, or the Network of European Researchers in Deprescribing - NERD) provide valuable resources for clinicians and researchers. Some of these networks provide useful clinical tools, such as evidence-based guidance for implementing deprescribing protocols in clinical practice, while others focus on researchers, offering training opportunities, pilot funding, and tools for conducting research. The evidence to support deprescribing efforts is based on research showing a wide variety of negative health effects of inappropriate medications and polypharmacy, as well as randomized trials testing the efficacy and/or effectiveness of deprescribing interventions on reducing the use of targeted medications. However, clinical studies of medication withdrawal are limited due to challenges in recruitment and retention of participants, as well as limited power to study clinical outcomes and often limited measures of patient-centered outcomes that matter for patients and their caregivers.

    Co-sponsored by the US Deprescribing Research Network (USDeN) and Australian Deprescribing Network (ADeN).

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Background: COVID-19, the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection, is milder in children ‎than in adults. Infected children and adolescents are at lower risk of hospitalization or ‎experiencing severe morbidity or mortality than adults, especially the elderly. However, there ‎are many unanswered questions regarding the overall impact of COVID-19 in children that ‎require further inquiry and discussion, some of which will be addressed in this forum. These ‎include short-and long-term outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children, as well as the ‎safety and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines and therapeutics. The impact of pediatric infection ‎on contacts of affected children, both at school and at home, will be discussed. Public health ‎and public policy considerations will be explored. Future directions for mitigating the impacts ‎of COVID-19 in children will be considered. ‎ Objectives: In this International Society for Pharmacoepidemiology Conference, the objectives are to 1) discuss the multiple facets of SARS-CoV-2 infection in ‎children; 2) discuss the strengths and limitations of the current approach to management of ‎COVID-19, from both a clinical and societal viewpoint; and 3) identify areas where additional ‎research is needed.‎

    Background: COVID-19, the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection, is milder in children ‎than in adults. Infected children and adolescents are at lower risk of hospitalization or ‎experiencing severe morbidity or mortality than adults, especially the elderly. However, there ‎are many unanswered questions regarding the overall impact of COVID-19 in children that ‎require further inquiry and discussion, some of which will be addressed in this forum. These ‎include short-and long-term outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children, as well as the ‎safety and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines and therapeutics. The impact of pediatric infection ‎on contacts of affected children, both at school and at home, will be discussed. Public health ‎and public policy considerations will be explored. Future directions for mitigating the impacts ‎of COVID-19 in children will be considered. ‎

    Objectives: In this International Society for Pharmacoepidemiology Conference, the objectives are to 1) discuss the multiple facets of SARS-CoV-2 infection in ‎children; 2) discuss the strengths and limitations of the current approach to management of ‎COVID-19, from both a clinical and societal viewpoint; and 3) identify areas where additional ‎research is needed.‎

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Plenary Session: Impact of COVID-19 on Health and Healthcare in Africa Moderator: Prof. Brian Godman, SIPBS, Glasgow, UK; SMU, Pretoria, South Africa and Ajman University, UAE Counting Deaths in Patients with COVID-19 Prof. Glenda Gray, South African Medical Research Council, South Africa HIV and COVID-19 Prof. Mary-Ann Davies, Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research, School of Public Health and Family Medicine COVID-19 Vaccines – Their Effectiveness and Brief Comments from Doctor Olayinka Ogunleye on Current Update/Hesitancy Rates Across Africa Dr. Ombeva Malanda, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, South Africa Dr. Olayinka Ogunleye, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Nigeria The Power of Social Media Driving HCQ and Ivermectin Use in South Africa Prof. Natalie Schellack, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa

    Plenary Session: Impact of COVID-19 on Health and Healthcare in Africa

    Moderator: Prof. Brian Godman, SIPBS, Glasgow, UK; SMU, Pretoria, South Africa and Ajman University, UAE

    Counting Deaths in Patients with COVID-19

    Prof. Glenda Gray, South African Medical Research Council, South Africa

    HIV and COVID-19

    Prof. Mary-Ann Davies, Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research, School of Public Health and Family Medicine

    COVID-19 Vaccines – Their Effectiveness and Brief Comments from Doctor Olayinka Ogunleye on Current Update/Hesitancy Rates Across Africa

    Dr. Ombeva Malanda, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, South Africa

    Dr. Olayinka Ogunleye, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Nigeria

    The Power of Social Media Driving HCQ and Ivermectin Use in South Africa

    Prof. Natalie Schellack, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Public Health Impact of COVID-19 Prevention and Control Policies on Childhood Immunisations in Africa and Beyond Dr. Kaja Abbas, London School of Health and Tropical Medicine, UK Impact of COVID-19 on Utilisation of Cancer Chemotherapy Services at a National Referral Hospital in Kenya Dr. Sylvia Opanga, University of Nairobi, Kenya Changes in Clinical Diabetes Services in Ghana in the COVID-19 Era and the Implications Eunice Twumwaa Tagoe, Strathclyde University, Glasgow, UK Impact of COVID-19 on the Management of Patients with Chronic Diseases in South Africa Prof. Johanna Meyer, SMU, Pretoria, South Africa

    Public Health Impact of COVID-19 Prevention and Control Policies on Childhood Immunisations in Africa and Beyond

    Dr. Kaja Abbas, London School of Health and Tropical Medicine, UK

    Impact of COVID-19 on Utilisation of Cancer Chemotherapy Services at a National Referral Hospital in Kenya

    Dr. Sylvia Opanga, University of Nairobi, Kenya

    Changes in Clinical Diabetes Services in Ghana in the COVID-19 Era and the Implications

    Eunice Twumwaa Tagoe, Strathclyde University, Glasgow, UK

    Impact of COVID-19 on the Management of Patients with Chronic Diseases in South Africa

    Prof. Johanna Meyer, SMU, Pretoria, South Africa

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Public Health Impact of COVID-19 Prevention and Control Policies on Childhood Immunisations in Africa and Beyond Dr. Kaja Abbas, London School of Health and Tropical Medicine, UK Impact of COVID-19 on Utilisation of Cancer Chemotherapy Services at a National Referral Hospital in Kenya Dr. Sylvia Opanga, University of Nairobi, Kenya Changes in Clinical Diabetes Services in Ghana in the COVID-19 Era and the Implications Eunice Twumwaa Tagoe, Strathclyde University, Glasgow, UK Impact of COVID-19 on the Management of Patients with Chronic Diseases in South Africa Prof. Johanna Meyer, SMU, Pretoria, South Africa

    Public Health Impact of COVID-19 Prevention and Control Policies on Childhood Immunisations in Africa and Beyond

    Dr. Kaja Abbas, London School of Health and Tropical Medicine, UK

    Impact of COVID-19 on Utilisation of Cancer Chemotherapy Services at a National Referral Hospital in Kenya

    Dr. Sylvia Opanga, University of Nairobi, Kenya

    Changes in Clinical Diabetes Services in Ghana in the COVID-19 Era and the Implications

    Eunice Twumwaa Tagoe, Strathclyde University, Glasgow, UK

    Impact of COVID-19 on the Management of Patients with Chronic Diseases in South Africa

    Prof. Johanna Meyer, SMU, Pretoria, South Africa

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Africa Union’s Smart Safety Surveillance Program AU S3 Hudu Mogtari, University of Nairobi, Kenya Digital Health, Data, and Data Science: Essential Tools and Assets for Effective modern age Pharmacoepidemiology: A focus on Kenya Dr. Christabel Khaemba, Pharmacy and Poisons Board, Kenya Steven Wanyee, IntelliSOFT, Kenya Risk Management in Pharmacovigilance – a Perspective as a Health Authority vs Market Authorization Holder Jayesh Pandit, Bayer HealthCare, Kenya Pharmacovigilance in a setting of High HIV and TB Prevalence Prof. Karen Cohen, University of Cape Town, South Africa

    Africa Union’s Smart Safety Surveillance Program AU S3

    Hudu Mogtari, University of Nairobi, Kenya

    Digital Health, Data, and Data Science: Essential Tools and Assets for Effective modern age Pharmacoepidemiology: A focus on Kenya

    Dr. Christabel Khaemba, Pharmacy and Poisons Board, Kenya

    Steven Wanyee, IntelliSOFT, Kenya

    Risk Management in Pharmacovigilance – a Perspective as a Health Authority vs Market Authorization Holder

    Jayesh Pandit, Bayer HealthCare, Kenya

    Pharmacovigilance in a setting of High HIV and TB Prevalence

    Prof. Karen Cohen, University of Cape Town, South Africa

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Drug Utilization Metrics in Pharmacoepidemiology Research Speaker: Prof. Ilse Truter, Nelson Mandela University, South Africa

    Drug Utilization Metrics in Pharmacoepidemiology Research

    Speaker: Prof. Ilse Truter, Nelson Mandela University, South Africa
  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Application of Pharmacoepidemiology in Clinical Practice (Using Most Prevalent Diseases in Africa as Examples)

    Application of Pharmacoepidemiology in Clinical Practice (Using Most Prevalent Diseases in Africa as Examples)


  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Moderators: Prof. Karen Cohen, University of Cape Town, South Africa Dr. Julius Asubonteng, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, US Development and Validation of a Virtual Reporting Tool for Diabetic Patients’ Conventional and Herbal Medicine Use and Treatment Outcomes at Kenyatta National Hospital Dr. Sylvia Opanga, University of Nairobi, School of Pharmacy, Kenya Effect of Mobile Applications on the Spontaneous Reporting of Adverse Drug Reactions: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Yohanna Avong, Discipline of Pharmacy, Graduate School of Health, University of Technology, Australia Real-World Effectiveness of Biological Therapy in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Caroline Tianeze de Castro, Institute of Collective Health, Federal University of Bahia, Brazil The Effect of Pharmacist-Provided Discharge Counselling on Medication Knowledge and Adherence Among Patients with Cardiovascular Diseases at Windhoek Central Hospital (WCH), Windhoek Liisa Anguuo, University of Namibia, Namibia Medicine Use Among Breast Cancer Patients at a Teaching Hospital in North-Central Nigeria Felicia Williams, Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice, University of Ilorin, Nigeria

    Moderators: Prof. Karen Cohen, University of Cape Town, South Africa
    Dr. Julius Asubonteng, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, US

    Development and Validation of a Virtual Reporting Tool for Diabetic Patients’ Conventional and Herbal Medicine Use and Treatment Outcomes at Kenyatta National Hospital
    Dr. Sylvia Opanga, University of Nairobi, School of Pharmacy, Kenya

    Effect of Mobile Applications on the Spontaneous Reporting of Adverse Drug Reactions: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Yohanna Avong, Discipline of Pharmacy, Graduate School of Health, University of Technology, Australia

    Real-World Effectiveness of Biological Therapy in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Caroline Tianeze de Castro, Institute of Collective Health, Federal University of Bahia, Brazil

    The Effect of Pharmacist-Provided Discharge Counselling on Medication Knowledge and Adherence Among Patients with Cardiovascular Diseases at Windhoek Central Hospital (WCH), Windhoek
    Liisa Anguuo, University of Namibia, Namibia

    Medicine Use Among Breast Cancer Patients at a Teaching Hospital in North-Central Nigeria
    Felicia Williams, Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice, University of Ilorin, Nigeria


  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    ATC/DDD Methodology Speakers: Prof. Hege Salvesen Blix, WHO Collaboration Centre for Drug Statistics Methodology Senior Adviser Irene Litleskare, WHO Collaboration Centre for Drug Statistics Methodology Moderator: Johanita Burger, North-West University, South Africa

    ATC/DDD Methodology Speakers: Prof. Hege Salvesen Blix, WHO Collaboration Centre for Drug Statistics Methodology Senior Adviser Irene Litleskare, WHO Collaboration Centre for Drug Statistics Methodology Moderator: Johanita Burger, North-West University, South Africa